Home | News | Montana | EPA says 30% of new buildings have and half of all illnesses are due to poor indoor air quality

EPA says 30% of new buildings have and half of all illnesses are due to poor indoor air quality

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Due to wildfires in and around the state, many Montanans stay updated on air quality.

But poor air quality in the workplace or at home can result in negative health effects as well.  The Environmental Protection Agency estimates nearly a third of new buildings have and half of all illnesses are due to poor indoor air quality. 

Industrial Hygienist Judy Murphy from the Montana Department of Labor and Industry says the poor conditions can leave people vulnerable to respiratory illness.

Murphy says, "So much of what we take in is through our respiratory system. So that's where you start to see the effects."

Murphy says it's better to the source of the bad air quality before taking action.

Murphy says, "If it's something like new carpeting, you have a lot of volatile organic compounds being given off and people have headaches and feel terrible from those chemicals that are being given off.  With that, the best thing to do is to ventilate the building as much as you possibly can."

At the end of wildfire season, smoke is still a prevalent source of poor air quality.  Murphy says in spite of Montana being a dry, colder environment, there are many occurrences of mold in the state.

Murphy says any time a person encounters poor indoor air quality, especially due to mold, it's better to take care of the problem as soon as possible.

 

Story by Charlie Misra, Beartooth NBC.
Copyright ©2012 Beartooth Communications Company. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

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wildfires, The Environmental Protection Agency, Judy Murphy

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